Online Therapy for Depression and Anxiety

Since the onset of the pandemic, the advent of online therapy has increased, but what is the best option to choose from. I have scoured the internet to search for ones recommended via reviews and their trust rating.

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It has never been easier to get the help you need; however, it does come at a price, but peace of mind and good mental health are worth more than the fee you would pay, in my opinion anyway.

With long waiting lists, it can take forever to be seen by a health practitioner in your area, and this is where online therapies fill the gap until you get to see your local one face to face. However, I’m still on telephone appointments with my psychiatrist, and I don’t think it will change any time soon.

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If you have depression and/or anxiety, you will find the suggestions below to be of benefit, and I have only included them if they have a good trust rating. It is simple to book an appointment, easier than visiting your own doctor or therapist, and you can chat in the comfort of your own home.

I hope the following will prove useful to you, and all you will need to do is click on the button, and you will be taken to their site.

The Online Therapy Guide

calmerry

1.
Calmerry

If you are looking for an online counsellor, Calmerry has great reviews and is easy to set up, you can do it within a couple of minutes, and you be matched with a counsellor just as quickly. This therapy will be great for talking through your problems and mental health; the reviews are excellent on Trustpilot, coming in at 4.6 out of 5.

You either text with your therapist or video chat with them, which can be done anywhere in the world. All therapists are accredited, and you can be assured of professionalism based on the reviews I have read. The average price for counselling services is around the $50 mark per week, which is worth it if you need a counselling session right away and not have to wait for half a year for one due to the pandemic.

2.
Online-Therapy.com

Great, if you are looking for online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), the founder discovered online to offline there is little difference in therapy outcome, so why not try it in your own home. The therapist is a qualified CBT practitioner, and you can access it from wherever in the world you are.

Their online subscription service starts at £23.96 per week, and with CBT, you will need more than one session, which is by far a cheaper alternative than offline therapy. Plus you get a 20% discount on the first month.

The trust rating around the web is good; I discovered on e-counselling they had a rating of 4.5 out of 5, which is a healthy score.

3.
Turnaround Anxiety (Child Focused)

If you have a child with anxiety, it can leave you at a loss about what to do, as sometimes they cannot express themselves for you to help. However, Turnaround Anxiety specialises in anxiety with children and, therefore, is the perfect people for help in this area.

When I checked for reviews, it was mainly individuals talking about the service through their own medium, such as blog posts or social media, and I have to say although I can’t give you a number out of five, all seem positive that the service has helped their child.

At the moment, they have a digital sale on where you can save $30 from your purchase, and they also cover OCD in kids, those with social anxiety who might not want to go to school, and it is best suited for children around the age of 6 to 12.

4.
ADAA

If you are concerned about your budget, look no further than the peer to peer support groups on the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. You don’t have to be from the US to gain the benefits, and you could find you prefer peer to peer online therapy to individual therapy plans from a counsellor or therapist.

It is a bit like an online depression forum, and you can help or be helped on there. They have over 50,000 subscribers, so there is bound to be someone you can talk to.

It is easy to join. You go down their list to find the right forum and support group for yourself. There is no trust rating as such because it is visible to view the help others receive.

online therapy

5.
MD Live (USA)

If you are searching for a psychiatrist and don’t want to waste your precious time on waiting lists, then the online choice would be MD Live, US-based, but it seems you need insurance; you can speak to a psychiatrist and get your diagnosis quickly. They do offer prescriptions too. (For the UK version, see below).

You have a choice of how you want to be seen, either video or visit, and the starting price is free. However, it will go up depending on the service you require.

As I searched around the web I found it had a trust rating of 4.7 out of 5, and that was based on over 11,000 reviews.

6.
Push Doctor (UK)

Much like the above, you can speak to a doctor and talk about your depression and anxiety. They may recommend online therapy or provide you with a prescription for your depression. I checked them out on the web, and they came in at 4.2 out of 5 on Trustpilot.

It is simple to get an appointment. You sign up, and you can be seen for many things, but their mental health options are anxiety, depression, grief, eating disorders, insomnia and plenty more.

If you are looking to be seen privately this is a good option for online doctor appointments in the UK.

As you can see, there are options if you have depression and anxiety, and these are the best ones I have come across; of course, you can check out free depression chat rooms and depression forums as these will also be helpful to you if your budget is zero.

Always do your research first when considering online therapy, and be aware there are apps and websites out there which are not worth their space on the web. I always check out new therapies by seeing if they are on Trustpilot first or have decent reviews from users from their own blogs.

I hope this will prove useful to you and if you have any comments on the list, please leave them in the comment section below for me to read.

Peace & Blessings

Lou

i'm not a doctor

Lou Farrell

Welcome to the mental health blog of Lou Farrell. I am a writer and copywriter who pens all manner of articles relating to mental wellness and mental illness. I write about my own experiences and the knowledge I have gained over the years as someone who has bipolar disorder. I hope you enjoy the website :-)

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4 Responses

  1. This is a great list of resources for online therapy. I’m a social worker and had not heard of some of these, so I appreciate your post. It’s great that there are options for no cost therapy, too.

  2. I think it so amazing that society has evolved to offer such services online to those in need. This is so helpful not only because it offers therapies at your disposal but because you can do it from the comfort of home. I think so many people can benefit from being able to feel comfortable while addressing their mental health without the sterile office setting. Bravo for sharing this!

  3. Dóra Deák says:

    Thank you for these suggestions! My anxiety increased during this pandemic. Losing most of my friends was really hard but I realized that those friedships weren’t real and strong enough to survive a pandemic. I think mental health is extremely important right now, more than ever!
    Thank you for sharing!

  4. Oh I heard of Adda before. I think most people in my country are using it too. This is a good informative post. Thank you for sharing. Pls take care of your health too.

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